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Certified organic by the USDA & WSDA #2771

© 2019 Great Northern Garlic.

85 Ernie Robinson Rd. 

Oroville, Wa. 98844

509-560-2001

Garlic Growing Resources

 

Here are a few excerpts from articles that we think that you might find interesting. Links to the articles are provided at the bottom of the page.

-This is excerpted from an excellent article by Pam Dawling titled  'How and when to plant garlic'.

 

If you miss the window for fall planting, ensure that your seed garlic gets 40 days at or below 40°F before planting,

or the lack of vernalization will mean the bulbs will not differentiate (divide into separate cloves).


The garlic roots will grow whenever the ground is not frozen, and the tops will grow whenever the temperature is above 40°F. In colder areas, the goal is

to get the garlic to grow roots before the big freeze-up arrives, but not to make top growth until after the worst of the winter. In warmer areas, the goal is to get enough top growth to get off to a roaring start in the spring, but not so much top growth that the leaves cannot endure the winter. If garlic gets frozen back to the ground in the winter, it can re-grow, and be fine. If it dies back twice in the winter, the yield will be decreased from the theoretical possible amount if you had been luckier with the weather. When properly planted, garlic can withstand winter lows of -30°F. If planted too early, too much tender top growth happens before winter. If planted too late, there will be inadequate root growth before the winter, and a lower survival rate as well as smaller bulbs.

 

Read More:

 

http://www.growingformarket.com/articles/how-and-when-to-plant-garlic

      -This is excerpted from The Old Farmers Almanac.

 

  • In Northern climates, harvesting will probably be in late July or August. In Southern climates, it will depend on your planting date.

  • Check the bulb size and wrapper quality; you don't want the wrapper to disintegrate. Dig too early and the bulb will be immature. Discontinue watering.

  • To harvest, carefully lift the bulbs with a spade or garden fork. Pull the plants, carefully brush off the soil, and let them cure in an airy, shady spot for two weeks. We hang them upside down on a string in bunches of 4 to 6. Make sure all sides get good air circulation.

  • The bulbs are cured and ready to store when the wrappers are dry and papery and the roots are dry. The root crown should be hard, and the cloves can be cracked apart easily.

  • Once the garlic bulbs are dry, you can store them. Remote any dirt and trim off any roots or leaves. Keep the wrappers on—but remote the dirtiest wrappers.

  • Garlic bulbs may be stored individually with the tops removed, or the dried tops may be braided together to make a garlic braid to hang in the kitchen or storage room.

  • Bulbs should be stored in a cool (40 degrees F), dark, dry place, and can be kept in the same way for several months. Don't store in your basement if it's moist!

  • The flavor will increase as the bulbs are dried.

  • If you plan on planting garlic again next season, save some of your largest, best-formed bulbs to plant again in the fall.

 

Read More:

 

http://www.almanac.com/plant/garlic

 

-This is excerpted from an article in Mother Earth News by William Woys Weaver.

 

 If you grow your own garlic or have a good farmer’s market, then you can enjoy a new kind of vegetable — garlic scapes. The scapes are the flower stems that garlic plants produce before the bulbs mature. Growers often remove the scapes to push the plant’s energy toward bigger bulbs, and when harvested while they are young and tender, the scapes are delicious.

 

 My first culinary encounter with garlic scapes occurred in a tiny Istrian village on the coast of Slovenia. The people in that part of the country speak Italian and have preserved food ways dating from ancient times. The dish they served me was made by sautéing the chopped scapes in olive oil, then pouring a beaten egg mixture over them, similar to a frittata. The cakelike omelet was then served with a liberal garnish of chopped fresh herbs and a glass of local wine, of course. How could anything so simple be so incredibly delicious?

 

Read More:

 

http://www.motherearthnews.com/real-food/garlic-scapes.aspx?Pageid=1#axzz3Nv94H8Qx